Review “Duncton Wood” by William Horwood (1980)

It might seem that a story about moles might not be particularly exciting. After all, they spend a lot of time underground and can barely see. But William Horwood has created an epic tale of love, faith, and overcoming all odds, which any lover of fantasy will enjoy. “Duncton Wood” is the story of Bracken…

Review “Always Coming Home” by Ursula Le Guin (1985).

“Always Coming Home” is something a little different. Rather than being a single narrative, it is comprised of many different parts, stories, poems, articles, even recipes. All of these serve to illustrate a culture, created by the author, of a future America. The main people described in the story are based in California, but it…

American Literature History | The Strange Mysterious Life & Death Of Edgar Allan Poe

I thought you might enjoy this article about the talented writer Edgar Allen Poe,

THE CHRONICLES OF HISTORY

The father of the detective story left everyone with the greatest mystery of all. What was behind his untimely demise? Edgar Allan Poe is known as being a literary master. His ability to intrigue, awe, and entertain readers leaves inspiration for new writers.

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Review “Hard to be a God” by Arkady and Boris Strugatsky

Arkady and Boris Strugatsky were writing in Soviet era Russia, and the environment in which they worked gives their books an added nuance, knowing the societal constraints under which they were working, and what they managed to achieve. This is the second book I have read by these authors, and I have enjoyed it just…

Adventuring with Asterix

‘The Adventures of Asterix’ is a series of French comics published from 1959 onwards. Created by Goscinny (the writer) and Uderzo (the artist), they relate the adventures of a warrior called Asterix and his friends, at a time when France was still Gaul and the Roman empire ruled. The setting, as well as historical character…

Review “Cat’s Cradle” by Kurt Vonnegut.

(First published 1963.) Vonnegut is not for everyone, and I suspect many would find him far too cynical to truly enjoy. His world view has always seemed to me to be without illusion, though sometimes lacking in joy or hope. That being said, his books are always interesting and thought-provoking. “Cat’s Cradle” starts with the…